Greg Bennick: Blog

Omphalos film premiere in San Jose CA

posted on Jan 25, 2018

Four years ago film director Gabriel Judet-Weinshel called and asked me to act in his debut feature film Omphalos about a murder mystery solved across time. I flew to New York City for a month. I was to play an eccentric, out of work juggler, with a tendency to speak like a psychotic maniac yet somehow make sense sometimes. Hmm: #typecasting

I was starring next to the insanely talented Edoardo Ballerini (Boardwalk Empire), veteran star Austin Pendleton (A Beautiful Mind, Searching for Bobby Fischer), and powerhouse Emmanuel Chriqui (Entourage, The Mentalist).

The last four years have seen Gabriel work endlessly on the edit, the special effects, the musical score. He is the definition of an artist, just consumed by and in his work, no matter what the roadblocks he faced and there were many.

I just learned that the film was accepted and is having its world premiere on March 3rd 2018 in San Jose CA at the Cinequest Film Festival. Most of us in the cast and the wickedly talented crew will be there in attendance. Its a total victory for Gabriel as an artist and his unique vision.

Word on the street, from the festival coordinators: “Omphalos succeeds in providing an unparalleled take on the ‘sci-fi-thriller’ as it packs in plenty of suspenseful twists, an intriguing romantic narrative, and consistently ravishing visuals while channeling through intricate themes of youth, love, and identity.” Boom!

Saturday March 3rd at 3Below Theaters & Lounge (288 South 2nd Street), 7:15PM and then throughout the following week both at 3Below and at the Century 20 Redwood City at different times.

Just added as PRODUCER to “Holding These Moments” documentary

posted on Sep 28, 2017

I have been brought on as producer to help with coordination and completion of the upcoming “HOLDING THESE MOMENTS” documentary on legendary hardcore band BANE. The film is being directed and edited by Dan Elswick and Ricardo Cozzolino.

Here’s what we currently need:

– TEXAS footage/ photos from ANY of the Texas shows from the final tour
– NEW ORLEANS footage/photos from the final tour
– ANY pre-2000 images or footage
– ANYTHING from shows overseas, ever

Important if you have any of the above: only send footage that you shot yourself or images you took yourself. Its important for the final film product so that all the rights to images and footage are accounted for and solid. Please send any footage or photos to

Follow us on Instagram: @holding_these_moments

Or of course on Friendster, MakeOutClub, or MySpace.

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Sea-Town podcast interview about activism and business

posted on Jun 11, 2017

My friends at Sea-Town Real Estate, which is a premier real estate company in Seattle serving a solid base of personalized clients, just interviewed me for their business podcast and you can hear it here:

SEA-TOWN podcast

We talked about the work of One Hundred For Haiti as well as taking time to dive into business topics. They are a great supporter of One Hundred For Haiti, spreading the word about our work.

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GDA Podcast on connecting with audiences!

posted on Apr 17, 2017

Thanks to my good friends at GDA Speakers for featuring me on their podcast recently where we discussed how I got into speaking and performing, and how/why its so important to really connect with and communicate with audiences.

This is a world-class group of people interviewing me on how to be world class for the audiences to whom I speak and the clients we all serve.

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Changing the World Without Having a Clue

posted on Feb 09, 2017

Tonight at Minnesota State University, my keynote to the students was VERY well received: 120 students attended and then afterwards I held a three hour question and answer session informally which let students ask direct questions about how to put their thoughts and passions into action.

The basic idea is that we all have the capacity to change the world if we just start to see cluelessness as a virtue rather than as a detriment. We can all start somewhere if we just choose to make it happen.

COLLEGES: Inquire about how to bring this keynote and discussion to your campus!

Bennick flyer pdf

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I see you. I am here.

posted on Sep 23, 2016

I just had a truly genuine human interaction. I was walking from my loft to the train, about a mile or so. I usually take a back way, along the tracks, by some spray painted walls and broken chain link fences. Just now as I was walking that path, about fifty yards ahead I saw a guy in tattered clothes climbing out of the bushes. He was collecting his things on the ground. My brain went into “self protection” mode as I got close. I knew the pitch was coming. I was a few feet away when he stopped me. “Excuse me,” he said, launching into what I assumed was the pitch for money, “Can I ask you something?” I stopped and turned to him, “Yes?”

He immediately started in with the pitch, with the rushed cadence of someone who has been denied so many times and who knows they need to get all the important words out as quickly as they can. “Well I’ve been having a hard time and I’ve been staying out here and I am wondering…I don’t know what to do… if you could help because I need help and I was wondering…”

I cut him off, slightly impatient for him to get to the point so that I could catch my train. I was ready for him to finish the pitch so I could say, “No…I don’t have any cash on me, sorry my friend” and walk on. I said, “I do need to get to the train…is there something specific you needed?” I was trying to prompt the end of the interaction.

He took a deep breath and said, “Well I’m not sure if I should just stay out here again and walk around for a few days, or just go to jail and turn myself in because the drug of my addiction makes it hard to be around people when I try and stop. And maybe it’s not safe for them and I think I should just turn myself in at the jail or else just walk around and try to avoid people for the next couple days…….what would you do?”

There was no money pitch. He was literally just asking for advice. The look on his face was truly desperate, sad, exhausted. I took a deep breath too and my whole tone changed. My whole world changed. I told him, so I could establish common ground, that someone very close to me was an addict and that I wanted to hear more. The look on his face in that moment. I don’t have words for it. He realized he was being listened to.

He told me about his addiction and where he was in his life. We talked about options. We talked about staying away from jail because the police are not friends of African American men, the homeless, or the drug addicted. We talked about how he was doing everything right by considering the safety of those around him. We talked about how good it was that he was trying to get sober even if the path seemed impossible. We talked about places he could walk to downtown to ask about safe places to detox and hopefully sleep safely. It was one of the most genuine conversations I’ve been a part of in forever. I just hope it was helpful.

At the end of our talk I told him again that he was doing everything right by trying to get sober and to keep himself and those around him safe. He looked at me and said thanks and added, “I’m trying. I can’t do it alone.”

As I turned and walked away he was looking out across the tracks, considering his options.

This isn’t a post about me. It’s a post about all of us. Its a post about being so wrapped up in getting to a train, one that runs every five minutes, that I would have been willing to ignore and deny another human being who was in a desperate place, before he even had a chance to finish his first sentence and connect. How jaded have I become, and how self absorbed. I think about the greeting one encounters in Africa when a person will greet another by saying, “I see you” and the response to having that said to you is, “I am here”. Connection, at the most basic level. Seeing one another. Being here. And how simple it can be to reach across the closest of distances…that is…if we don’t make those distances so far by being wrapped up in our own seemingly-so-important absolute bullshit.

I see you. I am here.

My only regret is that I didn’t ask his name, the guy by the side of the tracks who is trying to get sober in a way that keeps those around him safe, and who was at the point where he was willing to ask for help from a total stranger. What a hero.

A true creative revolutionary: David Bowie

posted on Jan 11, 2016

David Bowie was a constant presence and challenge for me. Twister of reality, exposer of awe. A true creative revolutionary. I’ve always thought that an artist is at their best when they cause us to take pause and reflect on the world, seeing it in a new way as a result of their influence. Bowie was that artist. Any time I encountered his work I was always left mystified.

I only saw him twice. Once on ‘The Glass Spider’ tour in 1987, with Peter Frampton on guitar, a tour that saw him onstage roving over a multi-layered detailed set which was criticized as self-indulgent at the time by reviewers. For me, that set served as a metaphor for the many ways he existed in my mind. No one could pin down David Bowie. He was here and not here at the same time. There was no space and moment specific to him. To see Bowie was to feel as though you had experienced a transcendent encounter, something larger than life. The presence of someone who had thousands of aspects to his personality yet was constantly himself no matter what aspect was shining through at that one moment. Bowie was relentless, unavoidable, untouchable. Just when you thought you might know him or that you were onto his true persona, he shifted gears and left you in wonder once again.
Screen Shot 2016-01-11 at 5.27.05 AM
I saw him a second time on the ‚ÄòOutside‚Äô tour he did with Nine Inch Nails in 1995. It was the first night of the tour in Connecticut, and while I heard the show got better as the tour went on, Bowie wasn’t at his best this night (though he did play some very obscure songs and covers: ‚ÄúJoe the Lion‚Äù and a Jacques Brel cover of ‚ÄúMy Death‚Äù). I remember walking out with my friend Al past the sound board, and a group of well dressed men in suits and ties stood there beaming with pride. Everything about them said that they were the financiers or producers of the tour. As we passed, one looked directly at Al and asked “How’d you like the show?” Al, not wanting to offend, said softly “It was very nice”. We joked for years that had he said “Well…it wasn’t quite Bowie’s best night” that the entire tour plan would have been altered within minutes, maybe including the firing of NIN and giving Bowie the run of the night in every city he visited (which would have been a terrible choice, as the best part of the night was Bowie and Trent Reznor onstage together).

But it was exactly that, the choice to tour with NIN, regardless of how that particular show went, which makes the night stick out in my mind. I’ve thought about it for years now. Here was Bowie, almost 50, taking the risk to introduce himself to a much younger demographic by having the foresight to tour with Trent Reznor. And that’s what made Bowie so incredible. Foresight. Vision. It was like he could see into the future and make choices that we would realize decades later were so ahead of the time in which they had taken place.

Every step of the way, David Bowie challenged us. He was always one – or ten – steps ahead of us in terms of image, fashion, style, sexuality, creativity. He had an entire generation asking if he was a man, a woman, and alien, neither, none, or all of the above? He twisted and toyed with time and space when we were in the midst of wanting to root ourselves in the here and now. He constantly made choices which made us reflect not only on what had been, but what might be in the moment, or what might come next if we were willing to take the risk along with him.

A constant presence in so many ways. My world looks different having encountered David Bowie throughout my life. There was no way it could not. His vision and genius was a challenge for each of us which forced us to reconsider how we experienced life when we stepped into his version of reality along with him.

And what a reality it was. I hope we all hold onto even a little bit of the magnitude of creativity, the depth of risk, and the expanse of wonder that David Bowie brought into the world.

Rest in peace, truly, to one of the all time greats.

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Transforming the world: One Hundred For Haiti

posted on Jan 11, 2016

In this video, recorded just before the 6th anniversary of the earthquake, Greg takes some time to explain the work that his organization One Hundred For Haiti does in Haiti and the difference between RELIEF and DEVELOPMENT. This video explains the core behind the work being done in Haiti and WHY he and the team do it. With a local focus and support people on the ground for The Rural Water Project, and partners “Little Footprints, Big Steps” and “Kay Tita”, initiatives like the anti-sexual assault GTPE trainings come to life in a major way and impact lives all over Haiti. Four and a half minutes is all you need to devote to hear the whole story!

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New Years early hours 2016

posted on Jan 01, 2016

Note to self in the early hours of 2016. Let every moment of this new year be a call or response to the need for revolution in my heart and mind. A devotion to writing, speaking and sharing about the upending and transformation of old patterns within…and from there to the world beyond the self.

“No illusion, sacred or deconsecrated, collective or individual, can hide the poverty of our daily actions any longer….Nothing is so valuable that it need not be started afresh, nothing is so rich that it need not be enriched constantly.”
– The Revolution of Everyday Life; Raoul Vaneigem

Snowbird, Utah

Educational session audio specific to the fair/festival industry

posted on Dec 07, 2015

In the early 2000’s I was actively involved in the fair/festival industry as a performer. I removed myself from that industry because I found myself frustrated at my own frustration with it. Its a strange business, because often times the people making booking decisions are not experienced business people, and its easy to get confused about how to approach them with integrity. I met some lifelong friends in the industry but needed to get back to my core as I felt out of balance with greed and self centeredness while I was aggressively pursuing contracts and profits.

This last month, I was invited back into the industry by the Rocky Mountain Association of Fairs to be their first ever speaker to their service members in the 90 year history of the organization. I did a keynote speech about “Managing the Unexpected” for the entire convention and also did the educational session below for a closed, packed room full of people specifically who service the fair/festival industry and were wondering how to do business. The session was about how to market yourself with integrity to the fair industry.

I am posting this here largely for attendees that day to review, but recommend that anyone involved in sales consider the ideas in it: without integrity you are nothing. With it, you can establish and build genuine relationships. Let those relationships be real and genuine. Bookings and profits can come later. Without your core passion, integrity, and focus intact though, honestly, shouldn’t you be doing something else with your life? Just sayin’.

Greg Bennick, Educational Session Audio for the RMAF Convention, Layton Utah, November 2015

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